This and That

Random bits of my life

Posts Tagged ‘Arts & Crafts Festival’

Khutsot haYotser 2013 Round-up

Posted by Avital Pinnick on September 16, 2013

IMG_8249.jpg

Puppet-maker Gili Marom (above)

Finger-woven sashes and straps from Peru. Although they resemble card-weaving, the sellers said that it’s finger-weaving. It’s also not dense enough to be card-weaving. I suspect the technique is similar to the French-Canadian ceinture fléchée but the Peruvian technique is called “rep braiding.” The weft is diagonal, so it’s not loom-woven.

IMG_8318.jpg

IMG_8317.jpg

Embroidered pillows from Hungary:

IMG_8494.jpg

We always try to go to the concert. The admission fee for Khutsot haYotser is a bit steep if you’re just going to look at the craft booths, but for a regular concert it’s a bargain. Here’s Shalom Hanoch (most of the performers tend to be on the “mature” side).

IMG_8409.jpg

Matti Caspi, who was performing with Riki Gal. (We really wanted to hear Ehud Banai a couple days later but my husband got sick.)

IMG_8590.jpg

Whew–finally posted all my Khutsot haYotzer photos! Sorry about the delay.

Posted in Crafts, Israel, photography | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Wood and Paint

Posted by Avital Pinnick on September 16, 2013

IMG_8522.jpg

These exquisitely turned boxes, cups, and dreidels were made by Eli Abuhatzira (below). A friend of mine took a wood-turning course with Eli. She said that she was making a nice but rather dull bowl on the lathe. Eli added a groove and enlarged a space a tiny bit and it turned the bowl into something extraordinary. I was hoping to come back to get better photos of him at work. The space was very crowded and I took these photos over people’s shoulders, under a very yellow light (probably halogen), so the colour had to be adjusted quite a lot.

IMG_8514.jpg

It wasn’t easy getting a good focus on hands behind a dirty plexiglass screen but this shot worked.

IMG_8505.jpg

Instrument-maker Shlomo Moyal gave an excellent lecture on how a violin is made, including the different kinds of wood that go into making a single instrument.

IMG_8534.jpg

IMG_8530.jpg

Hungarian furniture painter painting a chest.

IMG_8484.jpg

I couldn’t get a good shot of his hands because he was sitting next to the wall of the kiosk.

IMG_8491.jpg

Posted in Crafts, Israel, photography | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Video: Hutzot haYotzer 2012, Tav Cafe

Posted by Avital Pinnick on August 26, 2012

Hutzot haYotzer 2012 (Jerusalem International Arts  Crafts Fair)

“Tav” means a compartment or cubicle. The Tav Café is literally a cube surrounded on all sides by stages, with a band in one corner, on the second level. I had a seat at the edge, in a corner, so that’s why the angle is the same for all photos and the video. If I’d gotten up to move around someone else would have snagged my seat.

The aerial acrobat in the photo above was less than ten feet above me. I’ve photographed aerial acts before but this is the first time I’ve had to use the wide end of my telephoto! Trying to shoot someone  moving very fast in the dark is always a challenge. I have to crank up the ISO and resign myself to the fact that the photo isn’t going to be tack sharp, although this shot didn’t turn out too badly. Her face is reasonably sharp, even if the angle is a little unflattering (nostrils are rarely a girl’s best feature). Her right leg is sharp, with only a little motion blur in the left leg and the rope. This was cropped so that she would stand out better against the black sky and because I shot with a very wide angle while she was moving around, so that I would have a chance of getting her framed without cutting off a foot.

The performances are a mixture of dance, acting, acrobatics, outlandish costumes. Since this is the second year that I’ve watched the performance I’ve been able to identify some of the regulars. You really need to watch the video to get a sense of the performance, though. One tip: seats are limited and the “real” performance starts after dark (8:10 this year), so grab a seat early. If you’re with kids they might get a bit restless waiting for half an hour. You can sit on the outside for free but the table seats are for people ordering food and drinks.

This talented woman sings, acts, and plays the guitar.

Hutzot haYotzer 2012 (Jerusalem International Arts  Crafts Fair)

I’m wondering whether this glass ball juggler was the same guy I photographed at Balabasta last year, with a shorter haircut. Here’s a better shot of his face. Or maybe balancing glass balls on the back of one’s hands is a trend. In the video a musician with a bowed instrument is accompanying him. I think I’ve identified the instrument. It appears to be a Swedish nyckelharpa. (Here’s a link to a video of a solo nyckelharpa played by a master. One of the reasons I like blogging is because it gives me an excuse to look up info on new instruments, objects, artwork, etc.)

Glass Ball Juggler

Hutzot haYotzer 2012 (Jerusalem International Arts  Crafts Fair)

Tower of nested plastic water bottles balanced on the chin.

Hutzot haYotzer 2012 (Jerusalem International Arts  Crafts Fair)

Hutzot haYotzer 2012 (Jerusalem International Arts  Crafts Fair)

Hutzot haYotzer 2012 (Jerusalem International Arts  Crafts Fair)

Posted in photography, videos | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Hutzot haYotzer, 2011 (International Arts & Crafts Fair, Jerusalem)

Posted by Avital Pinnick on August 19, 2011

It’s that time of year again! Debbie and I went to Hutzot haYotzer last night. Although we went early, it was quite crowded. My main interest is the International Pavilion.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

A Slovakian bobbin lacemaker was working on a 5-pair design on a cylindrical pillow:

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

A Croatian lacemaker stopped to show me her sol needlelace. She used homemade square, circular, and heart-shaped forms cut from heavy plastic.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Cameroon:

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Indian Ikat weaver wrapping warp threads.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Traditional Ikat begins with wrapping the warp threads tightly with string.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

The threads are dipped in dyes (it’s a form of tie-dye, actually), unwrapped, and left to dry. Then they’re woven into cloth. That’s how the unusual patterns are formed, although nowadays most Ikat is printed.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Four embroiderers were working on shirts in the Romanian booth.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Guatemalan textiles are so colourful! They’re commercially woven but very reasonably priced.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Peruvian tapestry weaving, but the old floor loom in front is just a display piece.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Molas, handmade but strictly tourist-trade quality. I didn’t spot anything unusual there.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Extremely cheap Andean knitting. Not sure how one makes a profit on a 35 NIS alpaca hat…

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

This Bolivian piper is a regular at the festival.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

The El Salvador booth had a few elaborate arpilleros for sale.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

This year there were a couple gallery spaces, one for sculpture and another for painting. The sculpture section turned into an extension of the food court because seating space is scarce.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

At this point we moved to the Israeli pavilion.

It was great seeing Nuni again. She was my basket-weaving teacher. She makes gorgeous baskets and dyes the reeds herself.

Nuni's baskets

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Papafork makes wonderful whimsical sculptures out of recycled computer and kitchen junk!

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Chess set made of dreidels (spinning tops), by the Dreidel House.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Nava Crystals

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Posted in Crafts, Israel, photography | Tagged: , , | 7 Comments »

Hutzot haYotzer 2010 (Jerusalem International Arts & Crafts Festival)

Posted by Avital Pinnick on August 11, 2010

Thai dancers

Last night we went to Hutzot haYotzer. I haven’t been for a couple years, so I was glad to have an opportunity  to go this year. The festival runs from Aug. 2 to 14, 2010, 6:00 to 11:00 p.m. (midnight, after Shabbat),  in Sultan’s Pool, near the Old City of Jerusalem. This year there are over 150 exhibitors.  I thought the entrance fee (55 NIS, about $12) was quite fair because it is a lot more than a craft fair. There are live performances (I counted four musical venues), a big concert each evening, street theater, a food court, and demonstrations of spinning and glass blowing.

I always go to the international paviliions first. This year the offerings were somewhat more commercial than the last time I was there. Two years ago I found a wonderful Panamian mola that had been cut out of a blouse and made into a bag (blogged here). This year I bought a couple baskets (from South African and Bolivia), a small bag (Guatamala), and a painted turtle box (Indonesia). Or is it a box turtle? 🙂

International Exhibitors

List of exhibitors in the international pavilion.

Cameroon

Beaded figure of a woman from Cameroon

Hungary

Hungarian lacemaker making a narrow bobbin lace edging. The examples I saw were very similar to Russian bobbin lace, with its trails and plaits.

China

Chinese artist

Sbun-Nga – Dancers from Thailand

The Thai dance troupe, Sbun-Nga, performed on the small stage in the international pavilion. There were several dance sets, which began with what I presume were somewhat traditional dances. The costumes were lovely. The commentary, over a loudspeaker at the beginning of each set, was in English. If I recall correctly, the woman in the gold cape represents some kind of exotic bird.

Thai dancers

The set in the next photo was modeled on a cooking show. A bare-chested chef wielded a gourd, surrounded by a bevy of writhing maidens with mortars and pestles.

Sbun-Nga Dancers

This set was very funny. How can I describe it. A girl and a carrot. Wait a minute — they’re all holding carrots. According to the commentary, carrots are a sign of hospitality among hard-working Thai farmers (the guys in black). That certainly clears things up!

Sbun-Nga Dancers

Thai dancers

I also found some YouTube videos of their performance in Melbourne this year. They did the Beethoven-with-castanets dance last night. I’m sorry I couldn’t find a video of the carrot dance!

Mosh Ben Ari

The main performer was Mosh Ben Ari, an Israeli singer and composer who sings a mixture of rock, soul, and reggae. (Here’s the official Mosh ben Ari site). We really enjoyed it. My son stayed until the end. We left after about 45 minutes because it was getting late.

Mosh ben Ari concert

My son is somewhere among the masses of arm-waving teenagers in front of the stage (below).

Mosh ben Ari concert

We were sitting near the top of the stands.

Mosh ben Ari concert

I have a few more photos in my Flickr set. The festival was crowded but not unbearable. The food court has improved a lot. Now it’s a lot easier to find reasonably priced kosher food. People who have mobility problems may have difficulty going down some of the rock-cut steps but quite a few ramps have been provided.

Posted in Israel, photography | Tagged: , , | 6 Comments »