This and That

Random bits of my life

Hutzot haYotzer, 2011 (International Arts & Crafts Fair, Jerusalem)

Posted by Avital Pinnick on August 19, 2011

It’s that time of year again! Debbie and I went to Hutzot haYotzer last night. Although we went early, it was quite crowded. My main interest is the International Pavilion.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

A Slovakian bobbin lacemaker was working on a 5-pair design on a cylindrical pillow:

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

A Croatian lacemaker stopped to show me her sol needlelace. She used homemade square, circular, and heart-shaped forms cut from heavy plastic.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Cameroon:

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Indian Ikat weaver wrapping warp threads.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Traditional Ikat begins with wrapping the warp threads tightly with string.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

The threads are dipped in dyes (it’s a form of tie-dye, actually), unwrapped, and left to dry. Then they’re woven into cloth. That’s how the unusual patterns are formed, although nowadays most Ikat is printed.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Four embroiderers were working on shirts in the Romanian booth.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Guatemalan textiles are so colourful! They’re commercially woven but very reasonably priced.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Peruvian tapestry weaving, but the old floor loom in front is just a display piece.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Molas, handmade but strictly tourist-trade quality. I didn’t spot anything unusual there.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Extremely cheap Andean knitting. Not sure how one makes a profit on a 35 NIS alpaca hat…

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

This Bolivian piper is a regular at the festival.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

The El Salvador booth had a few elaborate arpilleros for sale.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

This year there were a couple gallery spaces, one for sculpture and another for painting. The sculpture section turned into an extension of the food court because seating space is scarce.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

At this point we moved to the Israeli pavilion.

It was great seeing Nuni again. She was my basket-weaving teacher. She makes gorgeous baskets and dyes the reeds herself.

Nuni's baskets

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Papafork makes wonderful whimsical sculptures out of recycled computer and kitchen junk!

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Chess set made of dreidels (spinning tops), by the Dreidel House.

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Nava Crystals

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

Hutzot haYotzer 2011

7 Responses to “Hutzot haYotzer, 2011 (International Arts & Crafts Fair, Jerusalem)”

  1. Miriyummy said

    I love going every year, this year we’re going this coming Monday, and thanks to your pix, I know exactly where I’m headed to first.

  2. Avital said

    Glad I could help! Have a good time. We’ll probably also be there on Monday.

  3. anastasia said

    wow! really an incredible fair! it’s interesting seeing all the different booths and hand skills. were you overwhelmed with the need to buy lots and lots of goods? the needle lace is gorgeous, i’m trying to learn what i can of it.

    • Avital said

      Actually, I only bought a shawl pin, for about $6. I have a small living space, so I have to be careful about what I buy. I don’t buy the “tourist souvenir” stuff if I can help it. The merchandise is lovely but very little is exceptional. After you go to these fairs for a few years you get an idea of what is rare and what is readily available. I prefer to take photos! 🙂

  4. Debbie said

    Lots of great photos, Avital! The evening was very enjoyable. Hope you have a good time tomorrow night and that the performance is good. I haven’t even had a chance to download mine yet….

  5. pam said

    Did i understand correctly – you saw all of this in one evening’s visit?

    I have never had the opportunity to visit a fair anything like this one – commercialized or not. So many fascinating crafts from so many parts of the world here – although I found it curious to see nothing from the Western Europe, USA or Canada.

    Thank you so much for sharing so many images from your visit. Like you, I prefer owing items that are made by hand and usually will not buy anything from vendors at craft fairs that are selling obviously commercial imports.

    However, I am a big sucker for Guatemalan fabrics – just never run into any here in the PNW. Purchased a jacket 25 years ago and still wear it every chance I get. The sleeves are unraveling and I need to repair. But i am not giving it up.

    A Dreidel Chess set?! Are you serious!? Cool isn’t it? Actually – quite attractive. I like it.

    You enrich my life with all you share, all your effort to take and edit and post. And I thank you.

    • Avital said

      My husband also noticed that they don’t seem to include crafts from the west. I would guess that it’s because they tend to be more readily available over the Internet. Or maybe the committee that decides these things assumes that crafts from more exotic locations will be better sellers. Thanks for the comments!

      Oh, yes, I did see all this in one evening. I went back a few days later and will post some different things!

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